Willow’s Story

WillowSteps2

This is Willow. Yay!

We recently adopted her through a rescue organization for Boston Terriers.

Willow is what is called a “red Boston” … i.e. a Boston Terrier with a recessive gene that makes her coloring reddish brown in areas where otherwise it would be black or brindled. So most of her coat, and her nose and  lips, are reddish brown. Even her eyes are a lighter brown. Though red Bostons are not AKC-recognized because of their coloration, they are still true Bostons – with that lovable Boston Terrier personality.

Here is Willow’s story, such as we know it.

Willow is 4 years and 8 months old. She spent the first 2 years and 9 months of her life in a puppy mill in Missouri – most likely one where they were trying to create “designer Bostons” – before she was surrendered by the breeder to a dog rescue organization outside of St. Louis. At this point, there is a gap in Willow’s history for almost 2 years.  Then in September, she was  taken in by a breed-specific rescue organization.

We contacted MidAmerica Boston Terrier Rescue about a month ago, looking for a companion for Penny who, understandably,  has been very sad since Abbey’s passing back in July. Our application was circulated amongst the rescued dogs’ foster families so that they could try to find a great match for our household. Willow’s caregiver persuaded me that Willow was the one for us.

Despite her early life experiences – and a few related issues that we are working on – Willow is an amazingly happy dog. She dances and wags her hind end and flaps her ears when she is happy; and when she is really happy, she smiles so enthusiastically that her top lip curls. She will also very gently hold my hand in her mouth and wag her tail. It is very sweet.

Penny and Willow are becoming friends. They are content to lie near each other when they are resting and have worked up to playing chase together several times a day. That is a good start. I am sure that they shall be wonderful for each other in time. We’ve had Penny since the day she turned 8 weeks old and Penny grew up with Abbey. So Abbey can’t just be replaced for Penny any more than she can be for us. And Willow needs time to adjust to family life. She does not yet know how to play with toys … something that we are working on. Penny will be a good role-model in that area. Willow has a very hearty appetite, though, and frequently begs for treats … an enterprise for which Penny appreciates having an accomplice.

Well, I need to sign off now. I have some little doggies to pay attention to before I get back to work. Snacks, anyone?

Wishing you a great weekend!

Missing Miss Abbey

Abbey&PennyMisbehavin'

This is a photo that I took a few years ago of Abbey (right) and our then new puppy Penny. This picture makes me smile because I had so very much fun watching the two of them play that day – as I did many, many subsequent days.

It also makes me laugh because it seemed as though Abbey was coaching her “baby sister” on just how much mischief a pup is allowed to get into without getting into trouble.  When she herself was a babe, Abbey was very good at inventing games, such as nibbling the buttons off my sweaters – which would be followed by her giving me a thoroughly happy puppy grin and a nub wag, and by her inviting her older sisters, Lucy and Ginger, to play.

Abbey loved all of her sisters, including ol’ Peachy who came along a few years after Penny. But Abbey and Penny were best buds and their antics were consistently amusing. They played lots of chase and tug of war and vied for the most snacks, the most belly rubs and the best position on the sofa. Abbey always got the most snacks, but I think that they were pretty equal on the belly rubs … and the best position on the sofa was that closest to my head.

Being next to me on the sofa wasn’t enough. Miss Abbey was a Mama’s-girl. She always followed me around the house, looking up into my face, and it always made me happy to see her right there by my side.

We had to say goodbye to Abbey recently, after she was stricken with an aggressive form of cancer. Abbey was loving, sweet and gentle, playful and joyful … and too young for us to have to say goodbye to her. And we miss her dearly.