A Dry Year

Like the rest of the American Midwest, Kansas has been experiencing a severe drought this year. In Manhattan, we are 13 inches below average rainfall as we approach year’s end. I was reminded of that statistic this morning. Heading out to the Konza Prairie to take photos of the changing seasons, I was struck by how low the Kansas River was when I crossed the bridge over it; so I pulled over into a boat launch area take pictures of the low water. It appeared quite shallow. I can’t imagine boating here.

KansasRiverLow8

The other side of the riverbed is just below the trees in the background.

KansasRiverLow7

The picture below is of one of the old bridge supports. (The new bridge, above, is not far away.) If you look closely, you can see where the river is trickling past in the background.

BridgeSupportAbandoned

I decided to take the opportunity to photograph some of the native plants that had bloomed earlier in the year.

DriedSeedHeads

While doing so, I stumbled upon this piece of driftwood. For a split second, I thought that it was a rattle snake. Afterward, I was rather keen to get back in my car.

DriftwoodSnake

When I got to the prairie, several of the creek beds were bone dry.

DryCreekBed

The deeper ones had a little water. Small plants were thriving in the puddles at the edges where the water was drying up.

PuddlePlants

But overall, it is pretty darned dry.

TractorOnKonzaAutumn

12 responses to “A Dry Year

    • Thank you for your wishes. Unfortunately, we did not get any snow or rain. The temperature plummeted from 46 to 9 degrees yesterday and not a drop of moisture fell.

  1. A very nice set of photos. If you didn’t identify that piece of driftwood, I would have thought that was a very excellent photo of a coiled rattler.

    Some family friends, who live in Junction City, have said the weather goes around them, whether it be rain or snow. They’ve observed this for many years. Hopefully, Mother Nature will eventually correct the situation.

    • Most of the time having the weather go around us is a good thing. It means that we miss tornados and heavy snow; but we could definitely use a bit of rain.

Comments Welcome!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s